Harry and Meghan’s blue Jaguar is a $500,000 green machine

Prince Harry used a borrowed, blue and very green car to drive his new bride, Meghan Markle to their wedding reception.

The sleek convertible that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex made their grand getaway in was a Jaguar E-Type Concept Zero, which is a modern, electrified version of the 1968 classic built by the automaker.

The newly married Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry, leave Windsor Castle in a convertible car after their wedding in Windsor, England, to attend an evening reception at Frogmore House, hosted by the Prince of Wales, Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Steve Parsons/pool photo via AP)

The Sun reports that they rented the left-hand-drive car for the event, but Jaguar will be happy to build and sell you one just like it for around $500,000.

jag

It’s powered by a 300 hp electric motor under its legendarily long hood, and is quicker than the six-cylinder original. Jaguar says it can hit a top speed of 150 mph and go 170 miles between charges.

Britain's Prince Harry drives his new wife Meghan out of Windsor Castle to their wedding reception, in Windsor, Britain May 19, 2018. REUTERS/Hannah McKay - RC1F089DE630

It won’t be the only battery-powered car in Jaguar’s lineup for long. The company is launching the $70,000 I-Pace electric SUV later this year.

SECRETS OF THE I-PACE:

Gary Gastelu is FoxNews.com’s Automotive Editor. Follow him on Twitter @garygastelu

The Chevrolet Silverado is getting a tiny turbo engine

The Chevrolet Silverado will be available with a turbocharged four-cylinder engine for the first time ever in 2019.

Along with four other engine options, the all-new pickup will be offered with a 2.7-liter boosted four-banger rated at 310 hp and 348 lb-ft of torque.

All-new 2.7L Turbo with Active Fuel Management and stop/start technology paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission (SAE-certified at 310 hp/348 lb-ft)

Back up a little, and that’s more torque than the Silverado’s V8 was putting out just a couple of years ago. Today, it trails Ford’s 2.7-liter turbocharged V6, which is rated at 325 hp and 400 lb-ft.

Fuel economy figures for the little Chevy engine will be firmed up closer to when the Silverado goes on sale this fall, but is equipped with cylinder deactivation, variable valve timing and a gas-saving stop start feature.

It won’t be the only turbo in the lineup. There will also be a 3.0-liter inline-6 diesel aimed at highway towing.

Traditionalists will be happy to know that updated versions of the Silverado’s naturally-aspirated 4.3-liter V6, 5.3-liter V8 and range-topping 6.2-liter V8 will fill out the lineup.

Gary Gastelu is FoxNews.com’s Automotive Editor. Follow him on Twitter @garygastelu

The new ‘Four Loko’? Capriccio Bubbly Sangria causes social media buzz

Have you consumed Capriccio Bubbly Sangria? 

Twitter users have been describing the Florida Caribbean Distillers beverage — which is 13.9 percent alcohol by volume — in various posts. 

“This drink must have some secret s*** they don’t include in the ingredients cause this wild asf,” one person said last week in a now-viral tweet, INSIDER reported. 

Florida Caribbean Distillers’ national sales director Dave Steiner spoke to Fox News. He called the drink “all-natural sangria made from 100 percent fruit juice and grape wine,” adding that it doesn’t have any additives or preservatives.

Capriccio Bubbly Sangria, however, has received other descriptions on Twitter. 

“did a lil capriccio test taster. this s*** really like a 4loko lol Be safe tho,” a tweet said. 

“That Capriccio Sangria is the new Four Loko” another Twitter user claimed, adding that they are “here for it.”

Steiner had a different take on the sangria being the “next” version of the drink. 

“It’s not a comparison that we make,” he said, adding that the company “can’t certainly control what happens in social media.”

Curious about the sangria? Twitter has you covered with an array of reviews. 

“Kay so about the Capriccio its all true it is VERY true,” a user chimed in. “It is the effects of a fourloko but the taste of wine with the sparkle of champagne. Get it. Its worth it. Two or chugging one will have you straight for a WHOLE night.”

“Ok so these capriccio bubblies taste like a fruit punch four loko. Nothing too serious with the taste but one bottle WILL F*** YOU UP,” another person weighed in. “Idk what’s worse that or 4lokos.”

“I had two Friday and woke up the next morning on the kitchen floor with a chicken tender in my hand,” one review said. 

Not everyone felt the same way. 

“my final verdict on the capriccio is that I will not spend $11.28 on that again,” a Twitter user wrote. “If someone else buys it I will drink it. As a starter. It doesn’t even get me tipsy so thanks for nothing.”

“Ehh, it was okay,” another consumer said when replying to the viral May 12 tweet. “It’s really not worth the hype.”

“All alcoholic beverages affect every person differently,” Steiner said, citing “age, gender, weight and food consumption” as factors.

He said the company is unable to “speak to every specific instance of how the product affects someone,” but that it recommends drinking responsibly and knowing your tolerance.

Steiner, who described the sangria as a “premium product,” said the company is “very proud of it, and very humbled by the sudden hype.”

The Michelin Tweel airless tire is now available

The tweel (a portmanteau of tire and wheel) has been a concept in the tire industry for some time now.

If you’re not familiar with that term, it refers to an airless tire.

Michelin has been developing its tweel for over 10 years. Now the French tire giant is ready to bring this revolutionary roller to the market.

Michelin Tweel Technologies is the name of the division tasked with presenting this airless tire into the production space. Now, don’t get excited and think you’ll be slapping one on your car. These tires are intended for use on UTVs.

Those would be the side-by-sides currently taking over the powersports market. The tire itself is a 26-inch airless radial tire, and there’s no need for any system to maintain air pressure. There is no air pressure.

You don’t have to worry about getting a flat. The tweel is constructed with a spoke system that maintains the integrity of the tire. It can deform a bit to the terrain below, which also increases its off-road traction ability. That’s why it should present a sweet off-road option for UTV lovers. But those lovers shouldn’t be on a hunt for speed. The maximum speed rating for the Michelin tweel is just 37 mph.

Right now, Michelin has prepared its tweel to fit 4×137 and 4×156 bolt patterns. That applies to the Can-Am Defender, Kawasaki Mule, and the Polaris Ranger. Michelin is cooking up more hub configurations so John Deere, Honda, Kubota, and Argo owners can swap to the airless setup sometime in late 2018 or early 2019. But you best prepare your wallet. The UTV-spec tweels will run you $750 a corner.

Michelin isn’t the first to market either. Polaris jumped ahead of the tweel revolution when it launched the Sportsman WV850 H.O. in 2013. This is an ATV fitted with a set of TerrarinArmor tires, which are a similar idea to Michelin’s tweels.

Regardless of which set you choose, there’s piece of mind in knowing that you don’t have to worry about getting a flat while you’re out on the trails.

George Dickel’s award-winning Tabasco whisky hits shelves

Tennessee whisky brand George Dickel is joining forces with another southern staple – Tabasco – for a spicy twist they are calling a Hot Dickel.

George Dickel Tennessee Whisky teamed up with McIlhenny Company’s Tabasco pepper sauce, which is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year, to create the bold new flavor for summer.

MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY AND WILD TURKEY TEAM UP TO LAUNCH NEW WHISKEY FLAVOR

“Both brands have such a rich history, and we’re proud to collaborate with our friends at McIlhenny Company to marry their unique flavor with our quality Tennessee whisky,” said Jeff Parrott, Director of American Whisk(e)y Development at Diageo.

According to the press release, the 70-proof liquor is given its kick by being rested for three days in barrels that are used to age tabasco peppers. The whisky is then blended with a distilled Tabasco sauce “essence” for a fiery finish.

The zesty George Dickel Tabasco Brand Barrel Finish hits shelves in May, but has already earned fans. The new blend took home the Gold Medal at the 2018 San Francisco World Spirits Competition last month.

However, the peppery booze isn’t for the faint of heart as the brand suggests to take it as a shot with an ice chaser – or pickle juice chaser or celery salt rim to help cut the burn.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

For those spice lovers, the whisky is rolling out nationwide this month and will run you $24.99 for a 750 mL bottle, but 50 mL and 1 L bottles will also be available.

Alexandra Deabler is a Lifestyle writer and editor for Fox News.

Tesla that crashed into truck was on autopilot, driver says

The driver of a Tesla that crashed into a truck at 60 mph on Friday told police she had the vehicle’s autopilot feature turned on.

The Tesla Model S fear-ended a fire truck that was stopped at a red light around 6:30 p.m., the South Jordan Police Department said. Witnesses said the vehicle’s brakes didn’t appear to be deployed just before the collision.

The 28-year-old driver told investigators that the Tesla’s semi-autonomous autopilot mode was activated, and that she was looking at her phone just before impact. The truck driver suffered whiplash in the crash, and the Tesla driver suffered a broken foot.

Tesla co-founder Elon Musk reacted on Twitter Monday saying it was “super messed up that a Tesla crash resulting in a broken ankle is front page news and the ~40,000 people who died in US auto accidents alone in past year get almost no coverage.”

Musk said it was remarkable that the driver suffered just a broken ankle in the crash, as “An impact at [60 mph] usually results in severe injury or death.”

He acknowledged the car’s autopilot feature “certainly needs to be better,” and said the company “work[s] to improve it every day, but perfect is enemy of good. A system that, on balance, saves lives & reduces injuries should be released.”

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has not opened an investigation into the crash, but spokesman Keith Holloway said it could still decide to do so. 

Federal officials in the past two months have opened investigations into at least two other crashes involved Teslas.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Tesla, possibly on autopilot, slams into truck in dramatic Utah wreck

Police in Utah are investigating whether a fast-moving Tesla car that rear-ended a fire truck on Friday was in autopilot mode.

The Tesla Model S was moving at 60 mph when it hit a truck that was stopped at a red light around 6:30 p.m., the South Jordan Police Department said.

In this Friday, May 11, 2018, photo released by the South Jordan Police Department shows a traffic collision involving a Tesla Model S sedan with a Fire Department mechanic truck stopped at a red light in South Jordan, Utah. Witnesses indicated the Tesla Model S did not brake prior to impact. Police Sgt. Samuel Winkler said the car's air bags were activated and that the Tesla's 28-year-old driver suffered a broken right ankle, while the driver of the mechanic truck didn't require treatment. Police in a Salt Lake City suburb say it's not immediately known whether a Tesla Model S sedan's semi-autonomous Autopilot driving system was in use when it rear-ended a truck apparently without braking before impact at approximately 60 mph. (South Jordan Police Department via AP)

Sgt. Samuel Winkler said the car’s air bags were activated and that the Tesla’s 28-year-old driver suffered a broken right ankle, while the driver of the mechanic truck didn’t require treatment.

 (South Jordan Police Department via AP)

The car’s brakes — according to witnesses — apparently were not deployed before the crash.

TESLA DRIVER WHO TURNED ON AUTOPILOT, MOVED TO PASSENGER’S SEAT ON HIGHWAY IS BANNED FROM DRIVING

“For unknown reasons, the Tesla failed to stop for the traffic at the red light and ran into the back of the Unified Fire Authority vehicle at 60 miles per hour,” Sgt. Samuel Winkler said, according to Fox 13.

In this Friday, May 11, 2018,  photo released by the South Jordan Police Department shows a traffic collision involving a Tesla Model S sedan with a Fire Department mechanic truck stopped at a red light in South Jordan, Utah. Witnesses indicated the Tesla Model S did not brake prior to impact. Police Sgt. Samuel Winkler said the car's air bags were activated and that the Tesla's 28-year-old driver suffered a broken right ankle, while the driver of the mechanic truck didn't require treatment. Police in a Salt Lake City suburb say it's not immediately known whether a Tesla Model S sedan's semi-autonomous Autopilot driving system was in use when it rear-ended a truck apparently without braking before impact at approximately 60 mph. (South Jordan Police Department via AP)

Police said it’s not immediately known whether the Tesla’s autopilot driving system was in use when it rear-ended a truck apparently without braking before impact at approximately 60 mph.

 (South Jordan Police Department via AP)

While the truck driver was not injured in the accident, the Tesla’s driver, a 28-year-old female, suffered a broken ankle.

The crash came less than a week after federal investigators said they planned to investigate whether a Tesla, which crashed in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, was using the semi-autonomous driving system. Two high school students were killed and a third was seriously hurt.

Nicole Darrah covers breaking and trending news for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @nicoledarrah.

Senior centers grapple with bullying issues

The unwanted were turned away from cafeteria tables. Fistfights broke out at karaoke. Dances became breeding grounds for gossip and cruelty.

It became clear this place had a bullying problem on its hands. What many found surprising was that the perpetrators and victims alike were all senior citizens.

Nursing homes, senior centers and housing complexes for the elderly have introduced programs, training and policies aimed at curbing spates of bullying, an issue once thought the exclusive domain of the young.

“There’s the clique system just like everywhere else,” said Betsy Gran, who until recently was assistant director at San Francisco’s 30th Street Senior Center. “It’s like ‘Mean Girls,’ but everyone is 80.”

“There’s the clique system just like everywhere else. It’s like ‘Mean Girls,’ but everyone is 80.”

– Betsy Gran, former assistant director of a senior center

After the cafeteria exiles and karaoke brouhahas, the 30th Street Center teamed up with a local nonprofit, the Institute on Aging, to develop an anti-bullying program. All staff members received 18 hours of training that included lessons on what constitutes bullying, causes of the problem and how to manage such conflicts. Seniors were then invited to similar classes, held in English and Spanish, teaching them to alert staff or intervene themselves if they witness bullying. Signs and even place mats around the center now declare it a “Bully Free Zone.”

“I think in the past I would have just stayed out of it,” said Mary Murphy, 86, a retired real estate agent who took the classes. “Now I might be inclined to help.”

Robin Bonifas, a social work professor at Arizona State University and author of the book “Bullying Among Older Adults: How to Recognize and Address an Unseen Epidemic,” said existing studies suggest about 1 in 5 seniors encounters bullying. She sees it as an outgrowth of frustrations characteristic in communal settings, as well a reflection of issues unique to getting older. Many elderly see their independence and sense of control disappear and, for some, becoming a bully can feel like regaining some of that lost power.

“It makes them feel very out of control,” Bonifas said, “and the way they sort of get on top of things and make their name in this new world is intimidating, picking on people, gossiping.”

In this Friday, April 13, 2018 photo, Patrick Arbore, left, talks to Corazon Leano as he conducts an anti-bullying class at the On Lok 30th Street Senior Center in San Francisco. Nursing homes, senior centers and other places older adults gather are confronting a problem long thought the domain of the young: Bullying. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Patrick Arbore, left, talks to Corazon Leano as he conducts an anti-bullying class at the 30th Street Senior Center in San Francisco, April 13, 2018.

 (Associated Press)

There is far less recognition of bullying as a problem among seniors compared with young people. Even among those who have been called bullies, many are unaware how problematic their behavior is until it’s labeled. Campaigns around the country have sought to spread the word, including a booklet circulated last year by the National Center for Assisted Living.

“In the life cycle, it doesn’t go away,” said Katherine Arnold, a member of the city Human Rights Commission in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, which created a public service announcement on its community-access station that included a portrayal of a man who was excluded from a card game and became the subject of gossip by other seniors. “There’s really not a lot of escape.”

Most senior bullying isn’t physical but rather involves name-calling, rumors and exclusion, said Pamela Countouris, a longtime schoolteacher who now runs a Pittsburgh-based consultancy that offers training on bullying. Women constitute the bulk of the bullies Countouris encounters among seniors, a reflection of lifespan disparities and the gender makeup of those who live at or participate in programs at senior facilities.

Countouris’ business began with a focus on school bullying but now centers exclusively on seniors. In the next month alone, she has more than a dozen training sessions planned.

After four years immersed in the wrath of older bullies, Countouris has heard all manner of stories. At a senior high-rise, a woman who saw herself as the queen of the parking garage would key the cars of those who crossed her. Elsewhere, laundry rooms became vicious places where the bullied had their detergent stolen and their clothes thrown on the floor. Bingo rooms so often devolved into battlefields — with lucky newcomers badgered and accused of cheating by veteran players — she came to call it “the devil’s game.”

“I didn’t realize it was an underground society where people could be mean to each other,” Countouris said.

“I didn’t realize it was an underground society where people could be mean to each other.”

– Pamela Countouris, consultant on bullying issues

In the worst cases, bullying goes far beyond bingo squabbles. Marsha Wetzel moved into a senior apartment complex in Niles, Illinois, after her partner of 30 years died and her partner’s family evicted her from the home the couple shared. At Glen St. Andrew Living Community, she said she was met with relentless bullying by residents mostly focused on her being a lesbian.

One man hit Wetzel’s scooter with his walker and unleashed a barrage of homophobic slurs. A woman rammed her wheelchair into Wetzel’s table in the dining room and knocked it over, warning “homosexuals will burn in hell.” In the mailroom, someone knocked her in the head, and in an elevator, she was spit on.

“I’d just go in my room and barricade my door and just pray,” said Wetzel, now 70 and living at a senior complex in Chicago. “I just felt like a slug, like I was nothing, like I wasn’t even human.”

In this Friday, April 13, 2018 photo, two women talk in front of anti-bullying signs at the On Lok 30th Street Senior Center in San Francisco. After problems at the facility, all staff members received 18 hours of training that included lessons on what constitutes bullying, causes of the problem and how to manage such conflicts. Seniors were then invited to similar classes teaching them to alert staff or intervene themselves if they witness bullying. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Two women talk in front of anti-bullying signs at the 30th Street Senior Center in San Francisco, April 13, 2018.

 (Associated Press)

Lambda Legal, which defends LGBTQ rights, took on Wetzel’s case and sued Glen St. Andrew, claiming Fair Housing Act violations. A federal judge dismissed the suit last year. An appeals court decision is pending.

Wetzel had seen such bullying throughout her life. She dropped out of high school when she became a punching bag for the girls who learned she was a lesbian. As a senior, she said, it felt even more traumatic — and the bullies even more vicious. She had a view of a cemetery from her window and would stare at it, thinking maybe only when she arrived there would she find peace.

“I felt like a person in a pool of piranhas,” she said.

The 2018 Honda Accord Sport is a stirring sedan

The 2018 Honda Accord has a modern fastback shape, adaptive radar cruise control, semi-autonomous lane-keeping assist, and a road departure mitigation system that will keep you from distractedly drifting into the abyss. But it’s a feature from the history books that truly makes the sedan worthy of its 2018 North American car of The Year title.

A manual transmission.

2018 Accord Sport 2.0-Liter Turbo

Honda is one of three automakers to offer one in the Accord’s segment, and it doesn’t have to. It will be lucky to sell two. Few Americans would even consider buying a family car with a stick, let alone write the check.

In fact, the art of changing your own gears is becoming so endangered that Honda felt the need to produce a YouTube video to teach people how to do it. Rest assured, the record held by “Despacito” for most views is not in danger.

2018 Honda Accord Sport 2.0T

That doesn’t matter to the folks at Honda. The company’s founder once uttered some jibber-jabber about life being measured by how much a soul has been deeply stirred, so they feel like failures if they don’t at least try to slip a few interesting models in the bread and butter drawer now and then.

They’re not dumb, though. The six-speed is only available in the Accord Sport models, which can also be ordered with an automatic as a no-cost option.

The Sport and stick can be matched with either a 192 hp 1.5-liter turbocharged four-cylinder, or a 252 hp 2.0-liter in the same configuration. Each version includes racy-looking wheels, grippy tires and stiffer, but not much stiffer suspensions compared to the other trims. The 1.5-liter cars start at $26,675, while the 2.0-liters are priced at $31,205 and also add a moonroof, heated seats, a blind spot monitor and a few other extras to help justify the premium.

2018 Honda Accord Sport 2.0T

The entire Accord lineup is roomier than the already-cavernous old one, with a welcome interior upgrade in both design and materials. The tablet-inspired infotainment system display is a notable improvement, with a much more logical interface that past attempts, and physical volume and tuning knobs that do their specific jobs better than any touchscreen can. It doesn’t have built-in navigation in the Sport, but is equipped with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto integration, so don’t forget your phone.

All of that safety tech mentioned earlier comes standard, too, plus a pedestrian-detecting automatic emergency braking system. The Accord is one of less than a handful of cars that combine that technology with a manual transmission. Yes, if it activates and brings the car to a full stop the engine will stall, but would you prefer the alternative?

If that happens in traffic, don’t forget to engage the parking brake before you hit the ignition. You can’t start the engine unless you do. It’s just another safety measure that anticipates amateurs and rusty customers giving old school driving one last try before the robots completely take over.

They might not ever want them too after a few miles. The Sport may not fully live up to the name, but it is a spirited sedan with an uncannily perfect blend of handling and ride comfort at its price point. And it pulls it off without any electronic wizardry in the suspension, just a well-tuned set of shocks and springs. The shifter is a gem that’s light and easy to use and always finds the right gear. Only in the worst traffic jams will you tire of using it.

Unfortunately, unlike in the old days, the manual transmission doesn’t deliver better fuel economy than its automatic counterparts. In the case of the Sport 2.0T, it gets the same 22 city/32 hwy rating as the 10-speed automatic. Oh well.

At least you don’t have to pay extra for the soul-stirring thing.

———-

2018 Honda Accord 2.0T Sport

Base price: $31,205

Type: 5-door, 5-passenger front-wheel-drive sedan

Engine: 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder

Power: 252 hp, 273 lb-ft torque

Transmission: 6-speed manual

MPG: 22 city/32 hwy

Gary Gastelu is FoxNews.com’s Automotive Editor. Follow him on Twitter @garygastelu

Supermarket called ‘sexist’ for Mother’s Day ad

Cropped image of woman in jeans using a vacuum cleaner while cleaning her house

In response to the backlash, Lidl pulled the ad.

 (iStock)

A German supermarket chain is in hot water for a Mother’s Day advertisement that some people are slamming as “sexist.”

Lidl Germany released an advertisement depicting Mother’s Day gift ideas that included a vacuum cleaner, a sewing machine and an iron, as well as a cookbook and espresso machine.

SPRITE APOLOGIZES AS INTERNET BACKLASH ENSUES OVER ‘SEXIST’ AD CAMPAIGN

After publishing the ad, shoppers immediately started to call out the international discount supermarket company for its “outdated” message, Yahoo UK reported.

“How was something like this made in 2018?” one person wrote on Twitter.

“Dear Lidl, I would need the sewing machine with a light blue heart Father’s Day,” another commented.

“# Lidl finds, # Mother’s Day is time to say thank you. Preferably with an iron or a sewing machine. Welcome to the 50s,” another tweeted.

Many of the commenters used the hashtag #dankefürnichts, meaning “thanks for nothing.”

The supermarket chain replaced the ad with one that featured jewelry and handbags for Mother’s Day.

 (Lidl Magazine)

In response to the backlash, Lidl issued a statement saying it took the feedback seriously, Yahoo UK reported.

“As part of our changing action weeks, we — like all retailers — take seasonal or holidays as occasions for our marketing activities,” the translated statement read.

“We offer special promotional products or reduce selected products in price, sometimes significantly, for a limited period of time, which is always very well-received by our customers. We regret that our current promotion causes some displeasure with some of our customers, and we take the feedback very seriously,” it continued.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

Lidl has since removed the ad and replaced it with one promoting jewelry and handbags as Mother’s Day gifts.

Alexandra Deabler is a Lifestyle writer and editor for Fox News.

Here’s how moms fake their reactions to gifts they don’t like, according to survey

Turns out 40 percent of moms fake their reactions to Mother’s Day gifts they don’t like, according to a new survey. 

Mother’s Day is this Sunday, and if you’re planning to give your mom something special this year, you may want to pay special attention to her reaction when she opens her gift. 

If your mom says “Thank you,” “Awww!,” “I love it,” “Wow, this is great” or “I really needed one of these,” then she might be among the four in 10 of moms who — according to a new survey of 2,000 adults — fake their reactions to Mother’s Day gifts.

MOTHER’S DAY GIFTS YOUR OUTDOORSY, ADVENTUROUS MOM WOULD LOVE

The study, conducted by market researchers OnePoll and commissioned by Groupon, looked at gift-giving habits for Mother’s Day and found that moms are looking for more sentimental presents and time with their family this year. 

According to the results, moms want the following for Mother’s Day: something with a sentimental meaning; to be taken out for brunch; a homemade item; a family trip; or a simple card.

mother's day 3 swns groupon

A whole 40 percent of moms will hide their true feelings about a gift they get from their kids, the survey determined.

 (SWNS/Groupon)

And it’s not only moms who may be scrutinizing your gift choice —your siblings could be trying to one-up you.

It turns out that 66 percent of Americans check in with their siblings to see what they’re getting for mom. However, be careful what you share, because 55 percent of those with a brother or sister will deliberately try to give their mom a better gift.

WATCH: BILL MURRAY REVEALS GENDER OF COUPLE’S CHILD ON THE GOLF COURSE

Even when it comes to filling out the card, 30 percent of participants say they will consider what their siblings write in their cards to ensure they aren’t upstaged in the sentimentality department.

And generally, most people are keeping it short and sweet when it comes to what they write: The average American will put down just 43 words (approximately 2 sentences) in a Mother’s Day card. 

The study also found that where you fall in terms of sibling order plays a role in how you approach Mother’s Day. While the average person spends $75, the data showed that it’s the middle child who ends up spending the most on mom.

mother's day swns groupon

The study also found that Americans are grateful for their moms — even if their gifts don’t go over as planned.

 (SWNS/Groupon)

In response to these findings, Groupon has released marketing efforts to help customers find mom an appropriate gift. 

In one ad, actress and company spokesperson Tiffany Haddish says, “You know that look you get when mom says, ‘I’m not mad, just disappointed,’?” she asks, before suggesting Groupon for finding a better option, such as taking mom to a restaurant or a show.

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

No matter your approach to Mother’s Day, however, one thing was universal from the results — people are really grateful for all that their moms have done for them. 

Putting food on the table was the number one thing that Americans were most grateful for when it came to their moms, followed by teaching respect for others, helping to learn manners, showing them how to be kind, doing laundry and exhibiting generosity.

Nutrition journal suggests new guidelines for egg consumption

We know eggs make a healthy, affordable and tasty meal — but now research has revealed just how many of them it is safe to eat in a week.

And in good news for lovers of a frittata or scramble, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found there were no adverse effects from having as many as 12 over seven days.

BILL MURRAY HELPS COUPLE WITH GENDER REVEAL

The researchers found that weight loss was similar over a year for people on a low-egg (two a week) and a high-egg (12 a week) diet.

They discovered that even participants with type-2 diabetes did not suffer adverse effects from eating a diet high in eggs such as inflammation, cardiometabolic risk levels or raised glucose levels.

“A healthy diet based on population guidelines and including more eggs than currently recommended by some countries may be safely consumed,” concluded the researchers.

beating egg with a fork, breakfast preparation for scrambled eggs

“A healthy diet based on population guidelines and including more eggs than currently recommended by some countries may be safely consumed,” the researchers said, noting that a dozen per week should be fine.

 (iStock)

It has prompted a call for a review of the National Heart Foundation guidelines, which recommend just six eggs a week.

While eggs — particularly the yolk — are high in fat, they are full of vitamins, minerals, protein and healthy omega-3 fats. The yolk is packed with nutrients, so there’s no need to opt for egg-whites only.

575-POUND MAN SHEDS HALF HIS BODY WEIGHT: ‘I WANTED TO SEE MY KIDS GROW UP’

Eggs do not significantly raise cholesterol in the blood, the Mayo Clinic reports, and people who replace a grain-based breakfast with eggs have been found to eat fewer calories over the day.

Just don’t store them in your fridge door.

This article originally appeared on News.com.au.